CARBS PRE AND POST WORKOUT

This week ADOFitness trainers will be addressing topics we get asked a lot about. This week Coach Tara will be addressing the benefits of carbs preworkout for sustained energy throughout your workout.

This is definitely a question that I get asked a lot about. Recently I have had many people asking about the benefits of carbs before they lift. A lot of these individuals were on a low carb plan or fasting before they lifted, and were noticing they were feeling weak during their workouts. Carbs are essentially your energy source and are going to help power your workout. I understand some people prefer to lift on an empty stomach and that is totally fine, but if you want to feel energized and strong enough throughout your entire lift I would definitely recommend getting the proper amount of carbs before you head to the gym. Everyone wants to have a killer workout and we all have had those days where our workouts are dragging or we lack motivation and energy. One of the biggest reasons for that comes from what you are putting in your body.

While protein plays a role in muscle building and repair, carbohydrates are actually going to be your bodies energy source for long workouts. They are one of the best fuel sources due to how well they use oxygen. The amount of glycogen (carbs) that’s stored in your liver and muscle cells is going to be solely dependent on your intake. Your body will convert glycogen to glucose, which then your muscles will use as fuel. The amount of fuel your body gets to use for this workout is going to be based on what you have just put in your body. Once your body runs out of glycogen stores, not only do you feel lethargic and tired but you don’t have enough glycogen to sustain your energy throughout the rest of your workout. This is where our bodies will then start to burn fat as an energy source. YES, you do want your body to burn fat if your overall goal is fat loss, but you do not want your ONLY fuel source to be body fat, as body fat burns at a much slower rate than carbohydrates providing less overall energy. Which in the end slows you down and makes it much more difficult to get in a great workout.

Studies have shown that once your body has depleted it’s self of carbs you will feel very fatigued, you won’t be able to get full muscle contractions, and your tryptophan levels decrease. Tryptophan assists with serotonin production which is going to help improve your motivation and mood. So when that drops it makes it so much hard to push through a workout and keep your motivation up. Studies have shown that a low carbohydrate diet significantly enhanced fatigue and reduced overall desire to exercise. Which makes so much sense, as it is very hard to stay motivated when you are eating very little and have very low energy.

So overall if you want to have amazing energy and strong workouts where you can actually sustain your energy, I would highly recommend making sure to get a good portion of carbohydrates in before you head into the gym to lift.

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HIIT CARDIO vs STEADY STATE

This week the ADOFitness trainers will be addressing the difference between HIIT and steady state cardio. Coach Trista discusses aspects of both methods.

HIIT (high intensity interval training) is short in duration but explosive in the movement and intensity of the exercise. This includes bouts of pushing yourself as hard as you can go followed by a rest period catching your breath until the next sprint. An average HIIT session should range from 10-20 minutes. Anything over 20 minutes would not be considered HIIT as our bodies simply could not allow it if it has been executed correctly. True HIIT should feel like you can’t breathe, and just when you feel like you cant push harder- you do- and this is where the magic happens. It’s uncomfortable, and that is why the body changes. The overall effectiveness of HIIT cardio is determined by the amount of time the body spends at it’s VO2 Max (the maximum rate of oxygen consumption during exercise).HIIT cardio creates an after burn effect much like weight training does. Which also increases metabolism. EPOC (excess post exercise oxygen consumption) this is the amount of oxygen your body needs to return to its normal resting metabolic state. The more oxygen that is needed- the more calories burned. A study has shown HIIT to produce an after burn effect of up to 21 hours post exercise.
Lastly, HIIT is more beneficial for preserving muscle tissue. For example, if you look at a sprinters body compared to a distance runner you will notice the difference in muscularity. That’s because a sprinter is activating muscle fibers with more intensity in their movement.

Steady state cardio can be defined as a continuous, moderate- low Intensity pace also known as (MISS) or (LISS). This is implemented at a fixed rate of intensity and sustained for an extended amount of time. About 55-70% of VO2 Max. Steady state can increase endurance and burn calories but does not make changes in the body to improve metabolism. Steady state does not have the same muscle retention as HIIT. Muscle tissue is at higher risk for catabolic effects as muscle fibers are not engaged in the exercise like they are in more explosive movements. However, steady state cardio is beneficial when an individual is already implementing HIIT cardio up to 4 days per week and needs to create a larger energy deficit. This is when you would combine both methods during the week for further results. Some people may enjoy steady state for relaxation purposes or due to physical Injuries preventing them from implementing HIIT. Both methods of cardio have merit, but it’s important to know the facts on both to decide what kind of cardio regimen is needed for your specific goals.

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WHAT DOES INSULIN DO FOR YOUR BODY???

This week the @ado_fitness trainers will be addressing topics that we get asked a lot about. This week ADOFitness coach Joey Guz explains what insulin is and what it does for your body.

If you asked someone about what insulin is, you would probably get an answer similar to “doesn’t it have something to do with blood sugar?” or “doesn’t that have to do with diabetes?” If you asked someone involved in the fitness community, you might get a more technical answer about uptake of sugar in the muscles and muscle growth. Insulin plays a crucial role in how your muscles take in sugar for energy and how sugar is stored in your body. By understanding a little bit more about insulin, you can use the way your body already works to your advantage in reaching your health and fitness goals.

Insulin is a hormone that is made in your pancreas. Insulin helps to regulate your blood sugar by either storing the glucose (sugar) you take in when you eat carbohydrates for future use, or utilizing that glucose for immediate energy. Insulin is like the key that unlocks your body’s cells to let the glucose in. When you eat, your blood sugar rises, and this signals your pancreas to start releasing insulin. The insulin attaches to your body’s cells, which lets the cells know it’s okay to absorb the sugar. This sugar is used in your cells for energy! If you take in more glucose then your body needs, insulin helps your body store it in your liver for future use. If in a few hours, your body needs more energy, but you have not eaten anything, your blood sugar will begin to drop. When this happens, your liver is alerted to release some of it’s stored glucose to feed your cells.

Part of the reason people gain weight when they eat too much is because there is that extra glucose in the blood that the body does not need… this is stored for future use when your body needs energy, but if you aren’t expending enough energy to signal your body that you need more, the glucose is never released. Instead, it is stored as fat. This is why weight loss is a combination of controlled intake and controlled output.

Insulin plays a key role in muscle development, too. When you eat and insulin is released, glucose enters your muscle cells, which gives your muscles more energy to lift weights, run, walk, bend, and stretch. It also dilates your blood vessels, allowing more blood flow to your muscles, which allows more nutrients into your muscles. This is why you often see competitors eating simple carbs on show day, or athletes eating simple carbs before a game. Simple carbs are easy to digest and the glucose from them enters your blood stream quickly. This gives you a boost of energy and signals your pancreas to release insulin and the glucose is taken up in your cells. Because your muscles have taken in all that glucose, they appear more full and prominent and they have energy to move. Since your blood vessels also dilate with the increased insulin, you also appear more vascular.

So how can you use all of this information to your advantage? You can plan your food choices around the times you are most active. By eating complex carbs, which are slow to digest, throughout the day you keep your blood glucose levels relatively stable. The glucose from complex carbs is released over time; instead of the big burst of glucose your get with simple carbs. Because glucose never really “spikes”, your insulin level is also stable throughout the day. This means your body is going to resort to that stored glucose for energy. When you know you are going to be physically active, like before a lift or run, it’s good to eat simple carbs. This creates that blood sugar spike that results in increased insulin release. The insulin opens up your cells and that glucose you just took in is used for energy, instead of being stored. This allows your muscles to get the nutrients they need to work and grow and prevents fat storage.

If you tailor your meals around your activity, you can help your muscles grow faster and prevent the storage of extra fat. Now, doing this is not mandatory for fat loss… if you are at a caloric deficit, you are going to lose weight. However, by knowing more about how your body works, you can reach your goals more efficiently!

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WEIGHT GAIN AND PREGNANCY

This week the ADOFitness trainers will be addressing some of the most common things we get asked about. Coach Jennifer talks about healthy weight gain with pregnancy.

 

Pregnancy and weight gain go hand and hand, but are you really eating for two? You do need extra calories but you’re not necessary eating “for two”. According to evidence based research, from the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement: ” Routine Prenatal Care, only 300 extra calories are needed for a healthy weight gain during pregnancy.” It’s important to gain a healthy weight during pregnancy for the mother and baby. There’s common risks to the mother when you gain to much weight, according to the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement.

“1. Increased risk for gestational diabetes
2. Increased risk for hypertension
3. Greater likely hood of cesaren birth
4. Increased rate of postpartum complications
5. Anesthesia related problems
6. Increased length of hospital stay post birth

Some common risks for the fetus include:
1. Increased risk for congenital anomalies
2. Lower success rate for breastfeeding
3. Predisposition to insulin resistance and more. ”
It can also be dangerous to not gain enough weight during ones pregnancy. It can lead to complications and even an pre term delivery. Slow and steady wins the race!!

Eating whole foods is a great way to gain a healthy amount of weight. It also helps you feel full because they are nutrient dense foods. Another great way to feel full throughout the day is to consume 5-6 meals and having snacks on hand helps too! Avoid sugary drinks and high calorie snacks. Swamp them out for water, sparkling water, pretzels, fruit, yogurt and lower calorie snacks. Try baking instead of frying food and try to use fat in moderation. if you eat fast food, try and pick the best options you can. There always better choices out there.

Another very important thing during pregnancy is how much fiber you consume. Fiber consumption can help with constipation, prevent weight gain , and help you lower your blood pressure. Which can help you avoid preeclampsia. Heres a list of of the best foods to eat while pregnant and many include that high fiber.

1. Water which is not a food but is the essence of life and helps you feel full longer, helps with constipation and dehydration.

2. Oats are full of fiber and keep you feeling full! Also known to help with breast milk production.

3. Avocados are a delicious way to get vitamins and healthy fats. Full of folate , potassium, B6 and vitamin C.

4. Wild salmon is full of omega 3’s and essential fatty acids.

5. Yogurt is full of calcium and you can make so many different dishes with it! Also great replacement for sour cream!

6. Lentils are packed full of fiber, protein and folate.

7. Lean Meats contain amino acids that help build all the cells in your babies body! If you’re a vegetarian there are also many non meat ways you can fill your protein such as lentils , spinach , tofu, beans, and many more.

8. Edamame is also a great plant based source for protein and fiber!

9. Nuts which are a delicious healthy fat and packed full of minerals.

10. Carrots and Peppers are full of beta carotene which converts to Vitamin A and helps with the babies eyes.

I hope this information helped everyone realize what your body actually needs in terms of healthy weight gain during pregnancy. Always remember to feed your body and baby nutritious foods before and after pregnancy to help prevent complications and also to have a healthy growing baby

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ALCOHOL

This week the ADOFitness trainers will be addressing some of the most common things we get asked about. Coach Suzie explains why alcohol and achieving your fitness goals don’t mix.

 

It’s Thirsty Thursday and you just smashed your lift in the gym, you PR’d on almost all your exercises and your gym partner says “hey, let’s go out and celebrate our gains and get lit!” You high five and head out to go to the bars.

Fast forward to the bar. You order a double shot because your favorite song came on and you’re still feeling amazing from your lift. You throw it back and order another double…and now we take a magic school bus ride down your esophagus and follow what that alcohol is actually doing to those gains you (thought you) made today.

Alcohol does not have any nutritional value but it does have calories, empty calories. It has 7 calories per gram, so that double (3oz) you just slammed of 80 proof vodka has nearly 200 empty calories in it. If you’re trying to lose fat and you’re drinking you’re slowing down your own progress. Aside from the empty calories you are consuming which will push the number on the scale up, alcohol slows down metabolism because it cannot be stored (it’s a toxin) in the body. Because the body can’t store alcohol it must metabolize it right away, which means the body won’t metabolize sugars and fats as efficiently. This is how alcohol can cause your metabolism to slow down (and fat to be stored). Along these same lines, one of the key functions of metabolism is to keep blood sugar levels stable in the body, but it can’t metabolize sugar efficiently while it’s trying to rid your body of alcohol so blood sugar levels drop causing hypoglycemia which is especially dangerous in diabetics.

Beyond slowing your metabolism and dropping your blood sugar to potentially dangerous levels, alcohol dehydrates the body, which includes your muscle cells. Hydrated muscle cells are important because they create an anabolic environment which encourages muscle growth. If your cells aren’t holding water then they won’t trigger the multiple anabolic reactions needed to grow muscle including increased amino acid transportation and protein synthesis. In fact, alcohol can lower protein synthesis by 20% as well as block the absorption of important nutrients like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and potassium. These are key to muscle contraction, relaxation and growth but perhaps not as key as testosterone is to muscle growth (that’s right I said it, the T word).

Now I’ve got your attention because I said the T word and nobody messes with your gains, I better explain myself. Alcohol continues to block your gains by LOWERNG testosterone and INCREASING estrogen. In one study, at the most intoxicated state, testosterone levels dropped by 25%. Another study done with rats found alcohol reduced Insulin like Growth Hormone-1 (IGF-1) by up to 42% (that’s huge). If you don’t know what any of that means, I will make it simple, those BIG drops in testosterone and IGF-1 mean no gains for you.

Keep in mind this is of course temporary and we do promote balance! But if you’re slamming alcohol daily you may want to reconsider. You can of course enjoy a drink in moderation here and there and still reach your goals, but the research should make you reconsider overdoing it if you’re serious about your fitness goals.

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